Google Chrome and download management

This marks the first blog entry on this website that isn’t related to fan writing, but is more about technology and my experiences with it. I want to write about my struggles with technology here, partly for my own benefit (so that, if I come across a problem again down the line, I can just look on my blog for the answer!), partly to solicit help from others, but mostly because I sincerely hope it might be interesting. Let me know what you think!

I have recently been looking at switching my default browser from Mozilla Firefox to Google Chrome. I am a Mac user, and I have two Macs – a MacBook from 2007 and an iMac from 2010, both running Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion). For some reason, on my MacBook, Firefox 5 was horrendously unstable and would regularly crash (Firefox 6 is better, but I’ve still seen the SBBOD way more than I should), and so I began to use Chrome as a solution until Firefox was updated to work properly with my MacBook. As a result, Chrome now occupies the position of default browser; Firefox no longer even resides on the Dock!

There is something making me hesitant, when it comes doing the same with Chrome on my iMac, however. I’ve been using Firefox for a long time (since before Firefox 1.0, in fact) and, before Firefox, I was a Mozilla Suite user. But the brand loyalty isn’t the problem – Chrome has impressed me enough with its adoption of Mac-like UI features to convince me to switch. It was updated with support for Lion’s full-screen mode quickly after Lion’s release, which is a Godsend on my MacBook’s 13″ screen. On my 21″ screen, as well, the fact it maximises to the content displayed (as any other Mac app would) rather than the window (which is what Firefox insists on doing) is a really nice feature. I would dearly like to take the plunge and move to Chrome, so what’s stopping me?

Well, in a word, add-ons. I have many add-ons for my Firefox browser. I have a plugin that brings Safari’s PDF reader interface over to Firefox. I have a plugin for an app called 1Password, which allows me to access all my login data for every website I visit. I have the FlashGot and NoScript plugins, which allow me, respectively, to use the download manager of my choice and block Tynt (the only reason I have NoScript). I also use the Camelizer, which allows me to see graphs of Amazon products’ pricing over time at the click of a toolbar button. And Easy YouTube Video Downloader adds download links to all YouTube videos, allowing me to easily archive content I like.

So, what does Chrome offer? Well, the 1Password team offer Chrome support, so that’s that sorted. The Camelizer isn’t available for Chrome, but their website does the same job, so that’s something I can live without. As Freddie points out in the comments, the Camelizer is available on Chrome, and the UI is actually improved over Firefox. NoScript isn’t available; but Tynt now allow you to opt out of their service from your browser, which is a little less elegant but achieves exactly the same task. Easy YouTube Video Downloader is an available Chrome extension, and I now have it installed. And Chrome has its own PDF reading feature, so I don’t need to hack in the Safari functionality as I do in Firefox.

What does this leave? FlashGot. There’s no FlashGot equivalent for Google Chrome. I currently use FlashGot to feed downloads to Speed Download from Yazsoft. Speed Download is supposed to be able to work with Google Chrome, without FlashGot. However, this involves totally uninstalling the app (using the company’s provided uninstaller) and then reinstalling it, which I dutifully did. Not only did that not fix the problem, it actually introduced a new one – the preference file on my Mac which told Speed Download it had been paid for was removed by the uninstaller, and because I purchased it in a MacHeist bundle, I could not reregister (the developer isn’t keen on those users that didn’t pay very much for his software, which does rather beg the question why he made it available in the bundle in the first place). Cue a trawl through Time Machine to find and restore the appropriate system files to their pre-uninstallation state (for the curious, if you restore com.yazsoft.SpeedDownload.plist both to /Library/Preferences and to ~/Library/Preferences, the app should be satisfied you bought it).

So, FlashGot is unavailable and Speed Download appears to be very tempramental in its support for Chrome. What does that leave me with? Well, I remembered using Leech (from ManyTricks) once upon a time, at which point I promptly Googled it. Turns out that changes in Lion and WebKit mean that, not only does it not support Chrome, but it doesn’t even support Safari any more. And, a perusal of the Speed Download forums revealed that they’re having exactly the same issue – both download managers are only compatible with Firefox at this point (through FlashGot).

So where does this leave me? Well, it means it’s almost impossible to switch to Chrome, from my perspective. I rely on my download manager, and without it I’m unlikely to switch on my desktop computer. But then, I had a stroke of inspiration – if I just put the Speed Download icon on my Dock, I can just drag links to it. This is my current solution to the lack of integration, but some download sites work in such away that this is not a perfect fix to the problem. Yazsoft say they are working on a major new release of Speed Download to get around the problems that Safari 5.1 has introduced for their app. Maybe that will mean that they introduce proper Chrome functionality, rather than the existing solution which seems only to work for a lucky few.

For now, I will be using Chrome, on a trial basis, on my iMac. If I can get by with dragging downloads to the Dock, and the lack of proper integration proves not to be too annoying, then I’ll stick with the browser and hope that Speed Download 6 features better Chrome support. It’s actually rather exciting; it’s been so long since I switched browser that it’s quite nice to have a change!

E-Sport

This article was, when I posted it here, unpublished. I wrote it for Speak Out With Your Geek Out, which was running between Monday and Friday; since Chris Garcia was doing a bit on Speak Out With Yuor Geek Out in The Drink Tank, I offered him the chance to publish it and he leapt on it! Enjoy.

The StarCraft II stage at MLG Anaheim.
The StarCraft II stage at MLG Anaheim.

Speak Out With Your Geek Out: E-Sport (September 2011)
Published in The Drink Tank #292 (ed. Chris Garcia), p3; available on eFanzines.com

I was torn, when it came to the time to write this article. No matter what segment of geekdom I move in, I am still a huge geek by anyone’s standards. I am involved in so many geeky pies that there’s always something that will make anyone look at me and say, “you did what?!” An excellent example of this is the fact that I once spent over $100 on a towel. In normal society, that’s totally insane; in SF fandom, it attracts raised eyebrows, waved hands and questions; even in Hitchhiker’s Guide fandom, it’s not considered an entirely rational step to take. So, believe me when I say I struggled to decide which part of my geek to embrace in this article.

However, I eventually settled on one that a lot of people in a lot of different areas of the pantheon of fandoms and hobbies would regard as somewhat odd: e-sport. As is usual with the prefix ‘e-‘, it stands for electronic; however, in this case we’re discussing the playing of videogames as a spectator sport. This is something that a lot of people haven’t even heard of, much less been tempted to try out! Whereas most people have at least heard of Dungeons and Dragons, or have rolled a dice in a board game, or saw a furry on that episode of CSI that was on a few weeks ago, e-sport hasn’t really achieved the same profile in public as a lot of other pursuits, which is a shame, in my opinion.

So, e-sport, then. The game that got me into e-sport was a real-time strategy (RTS), game by Blizzard called StarCraft II. You may have heard of it, or its predecessor; you’ve almost certainly heard of the MMORPG by the same company, World of Warcraft. At this point it seems sensible to answer a question: what is StarCraft II? You start out with a base and some workers that can be used to harvest minerals. From those minerals, you can build more workers, get more minerals, and begin to make buildings in order to create an army. You then proceed to use this army to crush your enemies beneath your feet/totally suck (delete as applicable). There are three races: Terran (the human race; think Space Marines and you’re there); Protoss (the ineffable and superior alien race; elves in space) and Zerg (bugs that can evolve from one lifeform into a variety of others; if you’ve seen Starship Troopers you’re set). It’s incredibly good fun, and the campaign lasts around ten hours. The multiplayer adds to that, with Blizzard’s ability to match suitable opponents ensuring online play is challenging, yet accessible and (importantly) fun.

SC2, as the game is known by its fans, is the 2010 sequel to a game that came out in 1998. It is played by hundreds of professionals from all the corners of the world, with major tournaments being played in South Korea (the GSL), the United States of America (MLG and the NASL) and Sweden (DreamHack). But all this comes out of the popularity of StarCraft, the first game in the franchise. Hugely popular in South Korea as a televised sport, StarCraft represents a cheap form of entertainment that everyone can pick up and play; a form of entertainment that can easily be broadcast, or streamed http://laparkan.com/buy-sildenafil/ online. As a direct result of this, it took off in popularity in a massive way. One thing that often makes people look at you weirdly when you talk about e-sport is this relatively simple fact: StarCraft is, currently, the largest sport in South Korea. However, I don’t want to speak in great detail about the history of the game (if you’d like to read a little more, I recommend this great article by Ars Technica on StarCraft‘s South Korean popularity).

Why do I like watching people I’ve never met playing a game I’m not that great at in rooms that are often thousands of miles away, often requiring me to shift my sleep cycle so that I’m working on some American timezone? The answer is because it is some of the most nailbiting entertainment I’ve ever watched. The sheer scale of the battles (especially at the higher levels) can be breathtaking, but sometimes games are won or lost with just four units being used very cleverly. The players play at such speed that there is always something going on, and strategies are unfolding all over the map, different plays from both players that could eventually swing the game in their favour.

Concepts like macro (how good a player is at controlling their army’s economy and production) and micro (how good a player is at controlling their army’s units) come into play, and different armies have different abilities. For instance the teleportation of a Protoss Stalker can be used to duck out of enemy fire, whereas the long range and devastation of a Terran Siege Tank can hold a position very effectively. Different players bring their own style to each of the armies, creating a cacophony of strategies that it is incredible to see come up against each other.

My favourite tournaments to watch are DreamHack and MLG (Major League Gaming) – this isn’t hurt by the fact that both tournaments are entirely free to watch, making them incredibly cheap entertainment over a weekend. I have three friends who live together in Leicester and I often watch MLG at their place, especially since they have both a projector and the best vodka punch you’ve ever tasted. But both MLG and DreamHack show other games, like League of Legends, the free-to-play, microtransaction-funded Dota clone. MLG also shows Halo: Reach and Call of Duty: Black Ops, whilst DreamHack streamed footage of Super Street Fighter IV and Heroes of Newerth at their recent Summer 2011 event. So, if RTS games aren’t for you, maybe you’ll find something else that tickles your fancy!

It’s fair to say that it’s plausible that, if you’re not a huge videogame aficionado, this is not really the sport for you. Part of what’s great about e-sport is that you can go and recreate the strategies and moves you’ve just seen, after you’ve watched the professionals make it seem real easy. However, I didn’t get into watching StarCraft II by playing the game; I got into playing the game because I’d watched the sport, so it isn’t a prerequisite. The commentators, too, can be the deciding factor in whether you enjoy watching the game – my favourite is Sean Plott, aka Day[9], whose enthusiasm and quirky sense of humour are really what drew me in, and are (to an extent) what keeps me engaged with it now.

Do I hope that e-sport becomes more widely watched? Yes, I do. At the moment, streams of big e-sport tournaments in the west are drawing in five-figure audiences, which isn’t by any means a small number of people (and the sponsors, such as Dr Pepper and Coca-Cola, certainly seem to feel it’s worth the money). However, it’d be great to one day see matches being streamed in pubs, just like football. Because, let’s face it: football has fewer explosions.

Variety is the Spice of Life

I’m still not sure what I think about this article. It came about as a result of me having severe writer’s block and not wanting to do a retread of what I’d already written before, and so I thought I’d write something about a tweet that I’d seen fairly recently. It’s fair to say that arguments about programme at SF cons have been happening since the dawn of time so it’s entirely possible that nothing set out here is new, original or even interesting; but it’s what I think on the matter, so I’m glad I’ve put it into writing!

ESA's Kepler spacecraft as seen from the ISS.
ESA's Kepler spacecraft as seen from the ISS.

Variety is the Spice of Life (February 2011)
Published in The Drink Tank #273 (ed. Chris Garcia & Steve Green), p6; available on eFanzines.com

I recently saw an argument brewing on Twitter, and it motivated me to think about the conventions I’ve been to in the context of the argument. Since the argument took place more than a day ago and Twitter is horrendous at letting one read tweets that occurred in the past, I can’t provide copious quotations from the argument, but suffice to say that @niallharrison tweeted, “@davecl42 @Paul_Cornell @pornokitsch I would be in favour of an sf convention where every item was about sf. Too radical?”

Before I go into that statement and my thoughts on it, I want to try to provide some context by describing the three conventions I went to in my first year of convention-going and what they offered that drew me into SF conventions as opposed to online fandom. I’ve been going to conventions since my first Eastercon in 2007, and since then I’ve been to a bewildering array of one-day events and weekend conventions that have entertained and engaged me in a variety of different ways. So, on with the cons!

The Eastercon that marked my first was Contemplation, held in Chester. It was a rescue con, having taken over from Convoy, which would have been held in Liverpool (and lead to the delay of the TAFF race that year, incidentally). As such, it was a bit different to your usual Easter event — most notably, there was no Guest of Honour, and the attendance that year was notably smaller than the other three Eastercons I’ve attended since. But, on the other side, I remember going to some interesting panels and I remember having a damn good time, so that worked!

Year of the Teledu marked the second convention I attended, in Leicester later that year, and it was almost a completely different kettle of fish. The first difference was the way in which the convention was organised, which was via Wiki. Anyone could edit or add to it, and this produced a real community feel to the con’s promotion and programming, amongst other aspects. I produced the readme for the convention, which was extremely good fun!

Recombination was yet another totally unique experience, being a science fiction convention, games convention and filk convention rolled into a package and held at a university! The crowd of people there was very different to my two previous conventions and the programme was also distinct from the other events I’d attended. I was on panels, I played (and bought!) games, I helped out with Green Room and a bunch of other stuff.

So, back to the argument, and I’m hopeful that you’re beginning to see my point. The three conventions above were all totally different conventions. By percentage, I’d actually say that Recombination had the highest proportion of panels and items directly related to what it had set out to do (although, given that any panel mentioning SF, gaming or filk came under that description, it could be described as having cheated!). Contemplation also had a sizable chunk of SF programming and Year of the Teledu wasn’t really designed to be a serious convention in the same way, but had space-hoppers.

These three conventions are all examples of totally distinct and unique conventions, and they all had their own programming and their own hotels and their own feel, their own style. Most of the programming was about SF, and some wasn’t. Certainly, I think that if one goes to an SF convention, there’s an expectation that SF will, at some point, occur; but I don’t think that it’s necessary for a convention to have a programme fully consisting of SF, especially given how difficult a definition that could prove to be!

As an aside, the question of whether Alastair Reynolds talking about his research would count as SF was posed. @niallharrison responded with a tweet. The first part read: ‘”Al Reynolds discusses his research background” is out.’ But, that’s something relevant to my interests as a fan of his work, and to me, that means it should qualify for inclusion at a convention at which he’s a guest. Is it SF? Well, I think there are pretty good arguments on both sides for that. I’d say it is, since his books are about space and tend to incorporate physics, both of which I’d say are probably facts that are directly linked to his research background.

A talk by Alastair Reynolds that was about his research background and how it had influenced his writing would, it was suggested, be alright. This seems like a slightly arbitrary distinction to me, since the two talks would likely have a significant amount of common ground and I’m sure that both would be well-received by the people in attendance!

This leads me to the second part of @niallharrison’s tweet: ‘This is not complicated, surely?’ I think it is. In fact, I would go so far to say that I think having a rigid limit on what can and cannot be a programme item at a convention is a bad idea because of its complexity! Surely, it’s a far better idea just to hold lots of conventions all with different ways of tackling the problem, and let the problem sort itself out as people work out which conventions they like best and go to them. However, even this idea runs into trouble when considering the large conventions such as Eastercons (and, I imagine, Worldcons, although since I have never attended one, perhaps I’m not qualified to talk about those!), at which a series of committees have to try to keep a very diverse and very vocal membership happy with similarly styled convention programming.

Maybe I, like @niallharrison suggested in that first tweet, am also being too radical.

What Makes Me an SF Fan

This is the second article I wrote for Journey Planet, and was written in order to plug my candidacy for the 2011 TAFF Race to Renovation, the 2011 Worldcon. This was written and published during an incredibly stressful point in my life, and I’m fairly happy with how it came out, especially the incredibly non-linear nature of the story!

The Hitchhiker's Guide panel at Odyssey, the 2008 Eastercon.
The Hitchhiker's Guide panel at Odyssey, the 2008 Eastercon.

What Makes Me a Science Fiction Fan (January 2011)
Published in Journey Planet #8 (ed. James Bacon, Chris Garcia & Claire Brialey), p12; available on eFanzines.com

This contribution to this brilliant fanzine arises because I’ve been asked, alongside the three other fantastic candidates for TAFF,1 to pen something on the subject of what makes me a science fiction fan. It’s a tough question, and I have decided to answer it by explaining how my first interactions with other fans and my entry into fandom really marked a distinct change (or number of changes) in my life, for which I am extremely grateful. This is also something that I talked about, briefly, in the first issue of my own fanzine, Procrastinations, alongside the article on T-shirts as a fannish equivalent of tribal tattooing.

The first change was attending two AGMs of ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha. They are a totally awesome club and if you are fond of The Hitchhiker’s Guide, you could do much worse to give them a look, even though my three or four years of active service have now come to an end. This really opened my eyes to the sorts of people that existed in fandom. Through the events I met people like Doug, Flick, James Bacon and many more people, as well as interacting with my very first Beeblebear.

The second change (a slightly misleading title, since it happened between my two ZZ9 AGMs) was attending the Peterborough SF club for the first time. I am eternally indebted to Max for inviting me along to my first meeting alongside the rest of the denizens of the society. It was at that club that I met Tobes, too, and for a long time I went religiously, like clockwork. It provided me with a place to go and discuss something that was very dear to me with people who had the same sorts of interests. My friends at school were good to me, and I enjoyed their company, but I was definitely the geek of the group – it was nice to know that other people existed who shared my interests, and that those people were, undoubtedly, the sort of people I wanted to meet more of.

The third change (which occurred before the second change) was being introduced, by Doug, to LiveJournal and the role it plays in wider fandom. Not everybody is on LiveJournal, but when you’re 14 years old and you can’t just get the train down to London being able to read about what other fans are doing and see what’s going on in the wider world of fandom really was a lifeline for me. I threw myself into the online world with gusto, and indeed, there was a time when I posted on LiveJournal almost every day (although now I am back to the levels I used to achieve when I first started on the site, and the days when I had to go back over a hundred entries to catch up in the morning are long gone).

The fourth change (which does actually come after the first three changes), which came around mostly as a result of the second and third changes, was my first event in more general fandom. This took the form of <Plokta.con> π: The Dangercon, which was my first one-day convention, held in London. This was a change for me in two important ways: firstly, it marked the pubbing of my first ish of Procrastinations; secondly, it marked my first real entry into wider fandom. I appeared on a panel or two, and failed spectacularly to win the balloon debate I appeared in.

I remember vividly arriving at London Bridge Station and looking around to see how to get to the pub at which the event was to be held. Having not often visited the city, and not often visited the station, it was slightly disorientating! However, as good fortune would have it, I saw two people who I decided to ask for directions on the basis that they looked like fans. Those people were Claire Brialey and Mark Plummer, and they were able to direct me superbly! I promptly gave them a copy of my fanzine, which turned out to be a fine investment as it has lead to be reading several a brilliant fanzine in return.

It was that event – the atmosphere, the discussion on the panel items, the conversations in the bar, the lovely, lovely people, that made me decide that I needed to attend a convention. My first Eastercon (indeed, my first convention at all) was Contemplation, in Chester, in 2007, and represents the fifth, and arguably the biggest, change of them all. Some people would say that it was a bad choice, since it was a smaller convention with no GoH, but actually, I think if it had been a larger convention, I would have enjoyed it less as my entry into the con-going world. From there, I sailed gaily onto Year of the Teledu (in Leicester) and Recombination (in Cambridge), both of which were also brilliant.

Some might assume that the answer to the question, “What makes you a science fiction fan?” is, “I like science fiction.” Whilst it’s true that the impetus for getting involved in science fiction was Douglas Adams, I think the thing that really makes me a science fiction fan is the people, not the subject matter. Having said that, being a science fiction fan is definitely increasing the amount of science fiction I consume (I make a point of trying to read something by every GoH at every convention I attend, something which has introduced me to some very fine literature!), and I do avidly enjoy it. I love appearing on panels (a particular highlight was a panel on The Hitchhiker’s Guide in front of hundreds of people with Neil Gaiman and three other brilliant Guide fans!) and I love being able to talk intelligently about things I’ve read or watched with other people who really get it.

Fandom vies with university as being the best thing that ever happened to me. It’s a huge part of my life, and I hope it will get even bigger as I continue into the future.


  1. You should definitely vote for one of us – I think you should vote for me, but I am, after all, biased. 

Why am I a Fan?

I was asked to contribute to the fourth issue of Idle Minds, which also commemorated the first year of its publication (and, at the time of writing, is also the most recent issue to be published). The theme was ‘Why am I a fan?’, and so that’s what I wrote about.

A Sony Walkman, seen through a cassette.
A Sony walkman, seen through a cassette.

Why am I a Fan? (July 2009)
Published in Idle Minds #4 (ed. the Vegrants), p27; available on eFanzines.com

Why am I a fan? It’s something I get asked regularly by my friends, people at school or uni who have never really come across the concept of conventions, or fanzines, or any of those words which to me seem so normal and commonplace.

There are several ways to answer the question, because the question itself can be asking any one of a multitude of things, and I’ll try to answer in three or four ways (concisely, since I’m already behind the deadline that was behind the first deadline, so I need to pull the finger out!). In chronological order then, I will answer “why do you like science fiction?”, “how did you become a member of fandom?”, and “why are you still a fan?”.

The answer to the first one is perhaps a slightly odd one. Rather than being lured to science through the wonders of science fiction, I was lured to science fiction through the beauty of science (or, more accurately, the beauty of astronomy). Throughout my life, the stars and galaxies above our heads have fascinated and enthralled me, and from a very early age I desired to find out as much as I could about that strange world. Through that desire, at the age of twelve I watched a BBC TV programme called ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ whilst at a friend’s house one evening, expecting it to be a documentary. I was instantly hooked, and that Christmas I received the radio plays on cassette. Never had my Walkman known such extensive use! That was in 2001, and so sadly, I was not a fan of the Guide until after its creator’s passing.

This discovery of science fiction beyond Star Trek and Star Wars was also my route into fandom, as I became more and more caught up with the Guide and joined ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha, the official Hitchhiker’s Guide appreciation society (no article on my route into fandom is complete without a plug for zz9.org). I went to my first ZZ9 event at the age of fourteen. Through ZZ9 I met fans: initially on LiveJournal, but, as I got older and more able to travel to the events, I met people in Real Life as well. Through those fans, I got into fanzine-editing, and convention-going (in that order).

The last question is the easiest to answer, since I’m preaching to the converted. Why am I still a fan? I get to go to weekend-long gatherings of people who are interested in the same things I want to talk about but still have disagreements of opinion that will let me think about things in a new and exciting way. I get to publish and read zines in which people write about things that I want to read about. I even get to commission articles from friends if I want to read about something that nobody’s written about yet. I get to expect people I meet at cons to have

Why am I a fan? I enjoy being part of such a vibrant and interesting community of people. Being a fan is a part of my life without which I would be half the man I am today, and I don’t want to let that go.